Fact or fiction? Uncovering misconceptions around living walls

Living walls are a beautiful, eco-friendly way to update your landscaping, enhance your brand and elevate your events. But as popular as living walls are, the process of building and installing a vertical garden can generate many questions and even spark a few concerns.

Believe it or not, there are a few misconceptions out there about living walls. Some might say they can be hard to maintain, while others believe they might be too expensive. We’re here to clarify those questions, uncover the facts and address any misgivings you might have about commissioning a living wall of your own.

Fiction: Living walls are hard to care for.
Fact: It’s no secret that plants require some attention to stay alive. But caring for a living wall doesn’t have to be complicated. Many of our designs feature built-in irrigation systems, so you don’t have to worry about remembering to water your wall. Many people also opt to hire a landscaping company or service to care for their vertical gardens. At TrueVert, we offer ongoing upkeep services for all of our installations for a reasonable rate.

Still not convinced? If you’re looking for a living wall that requires zero maintenance, a preserved moss installation would fit the bill. Preserved moss is a natural plant product that is preserved through a process that replaces the water in a plant’s cells with glycerin, another natural plant byproduct. The moss is then used to create beautiful green walls and artwork that last anywhere from 5-10 years.

Fiction: Living walls are too expensive.

Fact: At an average of $225 per square foot, green walls are definitely an investment—especially when it comes to large-scale designs. But what most people don’t know is that many projects can be adapted to be more budget-friendly. In fact, smaller green walls can look just as good while costing a fraction of the price.

Another option to consider if you’re concerned about price is a living wall rental. When you rent or lease a living wall, you pay only for the time you have it. That means no long-term investment and no maintenance costs to be concerned about.

If you want to learn more about the costs of living walls, check out our blog post How Much Does A Living Wall Cost?

Fiction: Vertical gardens offer only aesthetic benefits.

Fact: While they are indeed beautiful, vertical gardens have more going for them than just their looks! Living walls and plants at the office have shown to decrease worker stress and improve productivity. They can also absorb CO2 and VOCs, improving your air quality and removing chemicals that can lead to unpleasant symptoms like headaches, allergies, and nausea. Living walls have even been proven to help regulate indoor temperatures, helping you save on energy costs in the long run.

Fiction: Living walls are just a trend that will go out of style soon.

Fact: While green walls seem to be especially popular in recent years, they’ve actually been around for quite a while. In fact, the first green wall dates back to 1938 and was conceptualized by Stanley Hart White, a Professor of Landscape Architecture at the University of Illinois. In 1938, White patented a “Vegetation-Bearing Architectonic Structure and System” that, many years later, lead to the creation of the first successful indoor living wall in 1986 at the Cité des Sciences et de l’Industrie in Paris. So needless to say, this architecture and design trend is here to stay!

Are there any myths about living walls you’d like us to explore? If there’s something we haven’t covered,  contact one of our living wall specialists today.

From Our Gallery

Large Vertical Living Wall

Transforming a large vertical water feature into moss art

Create a Zen zone with a Living Wall

Trade Show Rental – Moss and Living Plants

Mendocino Farms, Tropical Plants outdoor Living Wall

Shop LOCAL!

Moss Art for Office Reception Area

Moss Sign Logo for Trade Show Green Wall Rental

Moss Frame Triptych

Wearable Art Gala – Los Angeles

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